Tag Archives: burning ambulance

Episode 5: Matt Hollenberg



Burning Ambulance has launched a podcast series, which will feature interviews with artists from the realms of jazz, modern composition, metal, noise, and whatever else interests us—much like the site has done since launching in 2010.

The fifth episode features an interview with guitarist Matt Hollenberg. He’s one of the most adventurous players around right now, and he’s got a lot going on. He’s a member of John Zorn‘s trio Simulacrum, along with organist John Medeski and drummer Kenny Grohowski; we interviewed all three of them a few years ago. He’s also a member of the band John Frum, with Liam Wilson of the Dillinger Escape Plan and some other underground metal folks; we reviewed their debut album earlier this year. He’s also just launched a new instrumental metal fusion project called Shardik, and his longest-running band is Cleric. They’ve been around for more than a dozen years, but they’ve only released two albums, one of which, Retrocausal, just came out. Apparently, though, they’ve got two other records in the can, one of which is entirely made up of Zorn compositions, from the Masada songbook.

Matt has a lot to say in our interview about Cleric, about Simulacrum and working with Zorn, about Shardik and John Frum, and about the state of metal in general. He also talks about a very bad accident he suffered earlier this year, which made it impossible for him to play for several months. It’s a really interesting conversation, and I hope you’ll enjoy it.

Stream or download the podcast below.


Episode 2: Matthew Shipp



The second episode of the Burning Ambulance Podcast features an interview with pianist Matthew Shipp. Shipp has been one of avant-garde jazz’s most compelling figures since coming to public attention in the early 1990s. He frequently releases multiple albums in a year, mixing solo performances with ones by his current trio, which features bassist Michael Bisio and drummer Newman Taylor Baker. In 2017 alone, he has released a trio album, Piano Song; a solo album, Invisible Touch at Taktlos Zürich; Vessel in Orbit, a collaboration with drummer Whit Dickey and violinist Mat Maneri; This is Beautiful Because We are Beautiful People, a collaboration with saxophonist Mat Walerian and bassist William Parker; Magnetism(s), a reissue of a 1999 disc with Parker and saxophonist Rob Brown, paired with a brand-new live performance by the same group; and an astonishing 11 albums in collaboration with saxophonist Ivo Perelman.

In this interview, Shipp discusses his earliest days and how he decided to become a professional musician; his current activities, including his creative relationship with Perelman and his decision to leave the Thirsty Ear label after a nearly 20-year partnership; and his newfound political activism, particularly his vehement opposition to Donald Trump.

Stream or download the podcast below.


Episode 1: Roscoe Mitchell



by Phil Freeman

Burning Ambulance is launching a new podcast series, which will feature interviews with artists from the realms of jazz, modern composition, metal, noise, and whatever else interests us—much like the site has done since launching in 2010.

The inaugural edition features an interview with legendary saxophonist and composer Roscoe Mitchell. Mitchell co-founded both the AACM and the Art Ensemble of Chicago, and has been one of jazz’s most forward-looking and inspiring figures since the 1960s. His latest album, Discussions (get it from Amazon), features large-ensemble interpretations of music originally improvised by a trio featuring Mitchell himself, Craig Taborn on keyboards, and Kikanju Baku on percussion. About a week after this interview was recorded, Mitchell led a new incarnation of the Art Ensemble of Chicago in their first New York performance since 2004. The group featured Hugh Ragin on trumpet, Tomeka Reid on cello, Jaribu Shahid and Junius Paul on basses, and Famoudou Don Moye on drums, and former AEOC member Joseph Jarman made a special appearance, reading his poetry accompanied by the others.

The interview runs about 45 minutes; Mitchell talks about the Art Ensemble, his composition “Nonaah,” his other solo works, and much more. Stream it or download it below.